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I wasn't entirely sure where to place this thread, but, as it most of the content will be probably consist of links to online videos, I've decided to post it here. If any of the admins think it should be moved, then please feel free to do so.

So, the purpose of the thread.

If anyone come across any transport-related videos whilst surfing the net (preferably documentary/historical/news-related items linked to the North East in some manner) then please use this thread to share your findings with others on the forum.

I'll start the thread off with a 1986 documentary aired as part of the BBC's Coast to Coast series. Entitled 'A Slow Train to Riccarton', the program documents the history of the old Border Counties railway line which ran between Hexham and Riccarton Junction. The line closed in 1956 and some of the track-bed is now submerged under Kielder Reservoir.

PART ONE:


PART TWO:


Enjoy.
The following link is a short news piece which aired on BBC's Look North sometime during March 1984. The story covers the last ever rail-tour between Newcastle and Consett carrying passengers on the line which once ran through Pelton, Beamish, Stanley, Annfield Plain and Leagate. Also featured, albeit briefly, are members of the Derwentside Rail Action Group (DRAG) who campaigned for the retention of the line so passenger services could once again serve communities situated on the line. Sadly, their efforts failed. But one can only wonder how public transport would look today around Derwentside if DRAG were successful in their campaign to save the line.

Anyways, enough blabbering on. Here's the video 'The Last Train to Consett':



You can read more about the arguments to save the line in the attachment below, taken from a pamphlet issued by the Railway Development Society printed in 1983.
Ill have a good look at this one. Seen photos of the railtour and can remember the line being taken up near the Wheatsheaf. The crane seemed to be parked up for a long time on the bridge by the pub

NEB Admin Team

Thanks for posting these links Adam!

I was aware of a line to Consett at one time but I wouldn't have been able to tell you exactly when passenger services ceased. As you say, it does make you contemplate to what extent the effect of reopening the line would have on the local public transport infrastructure. It would have revolutionised transport across this large swathe of County Durham.

This is an excellent page about the rail service from Consett. It includes photos, details of the freight trains that typically operated, and timings of the last passenger service. Well worth a read Big Grin

http://www.derbysulzers.com/24102.html
It hasnt had a mention here and not sure of the dates, but just North of Ouston junction, a spur went east off the ECML through what is now the Komatsu plant in Birtley - a bridge crossed the main road and headed North East, reaching the Bowes Railway, cutting through Springwell Estate, underneath the Felling Bypass, continuing down the Tyne, with a junction onto what is now the metro line at Pelaw.
It also split south of Wrekenton and went up towards Kibblesworth and the Tanfield Railway.

I wonder why the trains went all the way around via Gateshead and then Pelaw/Pelton, when they could have taken these lines?
(09 May 2013, 8:34 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: [ -> ]It hasnt had a mention here and not sure of the dates, but just North of Ouston junction, a spur went east off the ECML through what is now the Komatsu plant in Birtley - a bridge crossed the main road and headed North East, reaching the Bowes Railway, cutting through Springwell Estate, underneath the Felling Bypass, continuing down the Tyne, with a junction onto what is now the metro line at Pelaw.
It also split south of Wrekenton and went up towards Kibblesworth and the Tanfield Railway.

I wonder why the trains went all the way around via Gateshead and then Pelaw/Pelton, when they could have taken these lines?

I've done a little bit of research into this question for you.

Basically, the reason why trains went via Gateshead or Washington between Pelaw and Pelton was because the line to which you refer was not part of the LNER/BR network. The track, which ran between Dipton and Hebburn, formed part of a 'major colliery railway' according to a map featured in Ken Hoole's A Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain: Volume 4 - The North East. This means that the track would've been privately maintained and owned by a mine/colliery before falling into the hands of the NCB when the coal industry was nationalised in 1947.
There you go... Thanks for that.
When the railways were nationalised, as long as the guage was correct, I assumed anything could go anywhere so to speak.

Again, I always assumed the one West of Pelaw, that cut through Leam Lane Estate, went through where Wrekenton Golf Course is and around the back of Harlow Green towards Eighton Lodge was the one that ended up towards Dipton, rather than the one from Bowes that split near Long Bank (with one joining the ECML and the other going across the Marshalling Yards towards Kibblesworth). But thinking about it, these two probably joined up together at some point further west.
(10 May 2013, 4:40 am)Andreos1 Wrote: [ -> ]There you go... Thanks for that.
When the railways were nationalised, as long as the guage was correct, I assumed anything could go anywhere so to speak.

Again, I always assumed the one West of Pelaw, that cut through Leam Lane Estate, went through where Wrekenton Golf Course is and around the back of Harlow Green towards Eighton Lodge was the one that ended up towards Dipton, rather than the one from Bowes that split near Long Bank (with one joining the ECML and the other going across the Marshalling Yards towards Kibblesworth). But thinking about it, these two probably joined up together at some point further west.

The old colliery lines were the first lines to come under the control of the state. The South Shields, Marsden and Whitburn Colliery Railway, once owned by the Whitburn Coal Company, had the distinct honour of becoming Britain's first ever nationalised passenger railway when it came under the control of the NCB at the beginning of 1947. Known as 'The Marsden Rattler', the railway carried passengers locally along the coast between Westoe and Whitburn Colliery with additional stops at Marsden (roughly where the Grotto is) and Marsden Cottage Halt (to the rear of Horsley Hill Estate). Lines under the control of 'The Big Four' became nationalised on the 1st January 1948 under the umbrella of British Railways. Passenger services ceased on the line in 1953.

More information about this line can be found here: http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/m/mar...ndex.shtml
Yes, I knew about the Marsden line - in the rattler (or whatever it is called these days) on Shields sea front, there is some similar information about that line.

Just found this site too https://sites.google.com/site/waggonways/history-durham

The line I knew least about (wasnt mentioned on the site above) was the line from Rainton Bridge to Ryhope.
It made its way up to the Copt Hill at Houghton at the top of Hall Lane Estate and then cut across the top of Warden Law, dropping down behind the go-kart track and Burdon etc towards where Ryhope Engine Museum is and ending at Seaham (or via Doxford Park and Silksworth depending where you read about it, ending at Sunderland).
Personally I would have thought Seaham as Lord Londonderry was involved in both the pits in the area and the Harbour at Seaham). One site states both were used, via Silksworth initially and then routed towards Seaham.

Getting back to the S&T line and Consett Steel Works, I often thought about the Derwent Valley line as an alternative too - maybe because it dropped goods at Dunston rather than further down the Tyne like the S&T did, but again, Im surprised the steel works didnt use that either.
Already, I'm going to break my own set of rules for this thread by posting the following video as it's not set in the North East. However, I could make a tenuous link to the North East as it involves Solent Blue Line, now BlueStar: a Go Ahead Group subsidiary whose offices are registered in Newcastle.

It's a video about the bus-wars which took place on the South Coast and the Isle of Wight after the industry was de-nationalised in October 1986 as part of the 1985 Transport Act. Originally, I was looking for a video documenting the Darlington Bus Wars but I couldn't find anything. If any such videos exist, then please post the links or let me know where I can find them Smile

Only sticking this in here because of the stuff about Consett http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqJ5Ujhnq9U&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Look closely and you will see the workers getting on a VR decker and a BR train.
Kind of ironic a protest to London about the closing and ultimate privatisation of the steel industry was achieved by hiring a bus and train operated by nationalised companies
(27 May 2013, 10:32 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: [ -> ]Only sticking this in here because of the stuff about Consett http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqJ5Ujhnq9U&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Look closely and you will see the workers getting on a VR decker and a BR train.
Kind of ironic a protest to London about the closing and ultimate privatisation of the steel industry was achieved by hiring a bus and train operated by nationalised companies

Thanks for sharing. Had a brief flick through, and I think I spotted a HST parked up at Kings Cross as that Class 55 pulled in. Never actually seen this before, but I'm quite interested in the story behind it, so I think I'll watch tomorrow night.
Its actually a very interesting programme. Watched it a couple of times now.

We all know what happened in the end, but to see a whole town pull together and do what they did in an effort to keep the place open as well as hopefully changing the minds of Thatcher and Mcgregor as well as the attempts to lobby MPs in Parliament, was admirable.
I'd forgot how busy this place was and how often you took your life in your own hands crossing the road at Worswick Street.

Strangely enough, it was always scarier for me crossing in front of Pilgrim Street Fire Station than it was at the bus station - I was convinced a fire engine would come racing out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X90qGbH2iDs&feature=youtube_gdata_player
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyjH9rWOcSM&feature=youtube_gdata_player A fairly long youtube video from BR about the Intercity 125
This video briefly discusses the comparative success of the Tyne and Wear PTE against other PTE's throughout the country.

Some interesting facts revealed here, like, the average bus fare in the Tyne and Wear PTE area was 30p in the early 80s. I wonder what the average fare is now, and how it compares to the rate of inflation?

This series was broadcast before the deregulation of the bus industry; the synopsis is quoted below.



Quote:Part 9 of the 10 part Channel 4 documentary Losing Track,.
The series was first broadcast on the 17th June 1985.
Synopsis:
Barbara Castle, as Minister of Transport, introduced legislation that brought new life to some provincial cities. the 1968 Act was followed by the formation of Passenger Transport Authorities. This brought all forms of transport over a wide area under one centralised body.
Nice little video of Tyneside buses in the 1980s shot from various locations around Newcastle.

(09 Jul 2013, 9:19 am)AdamY Wrote: [ -> ]This video briefly discusses the comparative success of the Tyne and Wear PTE against other PTE's throughout the country.

Some interesting facts revealed here, like, the average bus fare in the Tyne and Wear PTE area was 30p in the early 80s. I wonder what the average fare is now, and how it compares to the rate of inflation?

This series was broadcast before the deregulation of the bus industry; the synopsis is quoted below.


Great video. Very interesting to see another tpe in South Yorkshire and compare it to the Tyne & Wear system. They both worked, yet they were ripped apart just a few years later.
(23 Aug 2013, 8:48 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: [ -> ]Great video. Very interesting to see another tpe in South Yorkshire and compare it to the Tyne & Wear system. They both worked, yet they were ripped apart just a few years later.

It sort of goes against the general consensus that PTE's mismanaged funds and contributed to the decline in passenger usage. Both the Tyne and Wear and South Yorkshire PTE's were exceptions to this rule. It goes to show that PTE's can work. It worked in the past and that's why I'm willing to give Nexus a chance when it comes to QCS.
Found this one from TTTV Northern Life of the Queen opening the Metro system

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