Trains

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A bit like the ferries thread, just trying to start some discussion about trips on trains. Anyone been on any unusual trips, sleepers or even a trans-European trek?
Did this a few years back after getting the ferry from North Shields to Bergen for a weekend away. www.norwaynutshell.com/en/explore-the-fjords/norway-in-a-nutshell/

Really recommended and worth the money (although we paid £70 for the day each opposed to the £120 it is now.)
The 8/9 hour day included a train journey to Voss, a change onto the Flam Railway (search for it if you havent seen/heard about it), onto a ferry for a trip through the fjords, onto a coach to travel via some hairpin bends to the station for the train back to Bergen - with time to stroll about and appreciate the sights all along the way.

The only other rail journey abroad was a few trips in Holland, including a return trip on a double decker train.
Probably the best place to put this: www.passengerfocus.org.uk/research/national-passenger-survey-introduction

A link to the spring National Rail Passenger survey
www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-22700805?ocid=socialflow_twitter_bbcnews

Just been reading this. Not as in depth as it could be, but strangely one argument carries a lot more weight than the other.
(11 Jul 2013, 7:47 am)Andreos1 Wrote: www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-22700805?ocid=socialflow_twitter_bbcnews

Just been reading this. Not as in depth as it could be, but strangely one argument carries a lot more weight than the other.

Interesting article, and I have to say, I agree with the points in both arguments. Real competition and open markets could only be a huge positive.
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Some of the arguments against nationalisation are over-simplified.

For example, the question isn't asked why passenger journeys decreased by 250 million between 1948 and 1995.

We must take into consideration the challenge posed by road transport. Although private ownership of cars had been steadily increasing since the 1920s, the mid-1950s saw the average family wage rise while the onset of mass consumerism saw the prices of many luxury goods (including cars) decrease. The car was viewed as a symbol of freedom for people both is status and in convenience. Also, the railways were viewed as an antiquated mode of transport - a relic from the Victorian era. Transport policy was geared largely towards roads and road-building projects, although the government did invest some money into the railways (see The Modernisation Plan of 1955) - this money which was largely wasted on vanity projects. As more and more people started to own cars, it was inevitable that the railways were going to suffer as a result.

The images below are from a 1967 booklet published by the BRB entitled 'Facts and Figures about British Rail'.

           

When looking at the period between 1948 and 1962, we see that the amount of passengers carried actually fluctuated. It was not until the Beeching era, passenger journeys started to decline and I'll leave you come up with your own theories as to why.

But lets look at passenger receipts. In 1948 they stood at £123 million and by 1967 they were at £179 million. By 1970, if you look at the BRB accounts for that year, you'll see that passenger receipts had risen to £227 million. So, BR might have been losing passengers but they were not losing money from passenger revenue as it was increasing.

Freight traffic, on the other hand, is another story. Freight traffic was the bread and butter for the railways and it was declining from the mid-1950s onwards, mainly because the demand for coal (the traffic which prodcued the most tonnage) was declining. The revenue created from passenger traffic was not enough to offset this balance and overall profitabilty declined as a result.
Competition across all industries should give us consumers a better deal, but I'm not aware of any of the industries privatised or introduced to the open market, from the mid-80's onwards, no matter what the promises, that have made things better for consumers.

We all know of these industries and we all know that there are some which have no competition and some where prices seem to be questionable.

Trains - revenue increased, pre-privatisation the figures are there to prove it.
East Coast have set the standard with regard to re-nationalisation and the folly of privatisation.

Whatever our thoughts are following the Beeching Report, we all know about Marples and how he benefitted from some of the decisions.
Car was the king during that period and following the failure to invest in rail following the war - but spending fortunes on the road, there was only going to be one winner. There are all of the socio-economic factors to throw in too.

Looking at the train v car debate now, they are both struggling to cope. Privatisation of the railways hasn't brought in the revenue into Government coffers like we were promised and very few routes have an alternative operator, giving us choice.

If you look at freight, the demand from Port of Tyne to transport imported coal via rail, it is massive. However, the infrastructure heading south to places like Drax can't cope with that demand
Someone has just pointed this out to me. Www.actforrail.bluestatedigital.com/page/event/search_simple

Several events and promotional activities are being organised with regard to bringing the train network back into public ownership
Just stumbled across this. I had never heard of it.

If you are just going from A-B, then possibly not for you, but for someone wanting to see the country, sample the complimentary food (and drink) on Virgin or East Coast, enjoy the delights of a sleeper service between London & Cornwall or London & Scotland, whilst exploring the country when your at it, then this ticket may just be for you.

Www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fares/pr20780b0a0400020167ed620a7e504e.aspx

It isn't possible to use it on the Metro, DLR or underground - but still excellent value, especially with the discounts available if your a railcard holder.

I've held the friends and family one for a few years now and had my moneys worth back, several times.
If you didn't have a railcard, it would be worth investing in one, just to get the massive discounts on this.

edit: Just for info, here is the entire list of rovers available to purchase - www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fares/rangers_and_rovers.aspx
http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fare...af335.aspx

I used this one last week whilst on my travels.
£33.50 for the child one - great value for money. I used my POP card to get from Sunderland to Metrocentre daily, and purchased an off-peak return daily from Metrocentre to Hexham. The Rover was valid from Hexham onwards. Luckily, nobody knew that it was only valid after 0845 Mondays to Fridays and anytime weekends/Bank Holidays - I certainly didn't either! Could have led to an awkward situation.

I had daily trips to Carlisle (inevitably), but in the four days, managed to go to:
- Manchester
- Preston
- Blackpool
- Dumfries
- Windermere
- Kendal
- Oxenholme
- Lancaster
- Warrington
- Chester
- Leeds
- Wigan
- Liverpool

Only on one day did the train inspector write in the date in which I was travelling. If I had wanted to, I could have had three extra days of travel for free. I didn't mind, I was shattered and needed the day of rest in between :p
That's really good value to be honest. I'm sure I pay about £77.00 return from Newcastle to Blackpool North.
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(26 Aug 2013, 4:18 pm)Daniel Wrote: http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/times_fare...af335.aspx

I used this one last week whilst on my travels.
£33.50 for the child one - great value for money. I used my POP card to get from Sunderland to Metrocentre daily, and purchased an off-peak return daily from Metrocentre to Hexham. The Rover was valid from Hexham onwards. Luckily, nobody knew that it was only valid after 0845 Mondays to Fridays and anytime weekends/Bank Holidays - I certainly didn't either! Could have led to an awkward situation.

I had daily trips to Carlisle (inevitably), but in the four days, managed to go to:
- Manchester
- Preston
- Blackpool
- Dumfries
- Windermere
- Kendal
- Oxenholme
- Lancaster
- Warrington
- Chester
- Leeds
- Wigan
- Liverpool

Only on one day did the train inspector write in the date in which I was travelling. If I had wanted to, I could have had three extra days of travel for free. I didn't mind, I was shattered and needed the day of rest in between :p

To be honest, with the range of tickets available, I'm not surprised they didn't know the restrictions or need to write the date down.
I have only ever been asked once (East Coast) to show my family and friends card and when I asked one guard if they needed to see it (South West Trains), the reply was 'yeah, if you have it with you'.

The inspector just gave a look of puzzlement, when I showed him the Tyne Tees Day Ranger a few weeks back, as though he had never seen one before in his life.
(26 Aug 2013, 4:29 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: To be honest, with the range of tickets available, I'm not surprised they didn't know the restrictions or need to write the date down.
I have only ever been asked once (East Coast) to show my family and friends card and when I asked one guard if they needed to see it (South West Trains), the reply was 'yeah, if you have it with you'.

The inspector just gave a look of puzzlement, when I showed him the Tyne Tees Day Ranger a few weeks back, as though he had never seen one before in his life.

Received that look quite a lot in the four days, and that's from a ticket I assumed would be fairly popular.
I mean, I didn't help by having my Nexus CAT ticket purchased on the first bus I got on to Park Lane followed by my return and then the Rover on top of that...
By the end of it, I got bored of them looking so confused and just started showing them the Rover - not bothering with the return or Nexus CAT... They didn't know the boundary, so it was all good.
www.metro.co.uk/2013/09/19/cow-on-the-tracks-delays-trains-at-nailsea-and-backwell-station-4055712/

"Mooooove along, there's nothing to see" - said the guard.

The disgruntled passenger replied with a curt look on her face "Pull the udder one!"

bdum tish! Big Grin
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(20 Sep 2013, 12:14 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: www.metro.co.uk/2013/09/19/cow-on-the-tracks-delays-trains-at-nailsea-and-backwell-station-4055712/

"Mooooove along, there's nothing to see" - said the guard.

The disgruntled passenger replied with a curt look on her face "Pull the udder one!"

bdum tish! Big Grin

Was it waiting for the milk train?

Marxista Fozz
(21 Sep 2013, 9:11 am)fozzovmurton Wrote: Was it waiting for the milk train?

Marxista Fozz

They tried honking its horn.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
It was chaos for co-moo-ters
(21 Sep 2013, 11:56 pm)Adam Wrote: It was chaos for co-moo-ters

One was given a pat on his head for his efforts
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/the-f...rail-fares

The Transport Minister outlined his plans regarding train ticket prices today.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(09 Oct 2013, 6:23 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/the-f...rail-fares

The Transport Minister outlined his plans regarding train ticket prices today.

Capping at 6.1% is still almost double the current rate of inflation, and is way beyond what average workers are getting in the private sector. Public sector on the other hand still has pay frozen at 1% if anything at all. They really haven't gone far enough.
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