Wrestling

853 Replies, 337293 Views

Don't know if I should be admitting this at 31, but I enjoy wrestling, lol, is there many other fans among us.

I was lucky to be growing up at a time when Wrestling was hot it was on fire, during the Attitude era, Austin v McMahon, DX at there peak.

British Bulldog was my favourite wrestler back in the day, I also liked The Rock, Stone Cold, HHH and HBK.

I don't watch it as much these days, I pretty much lost interest after Eddie Guerrero died and after the Chris Benoit double murder suicide.

I have seen it live at Newcastle and The Odyssey in Belfast and even met some of the Raw Roster at the Hilton in Belfast, which was an experience.

Is there any other fans among us
Don't worry man am 24, don't really watch wrestling now. WWE is terrible and TNA puts on a half decent show at times. I miss the Monday night wars but watched WCW a lot more.
I've never really been too big a fan of wrestling. I know many who still love it though, my age (15) and above.
Of course the fan-base must still be large enough, otherwise it still wouldn't be on air - ey? :p
Yeah, it is still pretty huge, especially in this country, after the US, O think Britain and Ireland is the biggest market for WWE hence the tours they undertake here at least twice a year, and we have always been decently represented on the roster in the last 25 years, Dynamite Kid, British Bulldog, William Regal, Katie Lea, Paul Burchill, Dave Finlay and more recently Sheamus and Wade Barrett.

I miss the Monday Night War, although I was never a WCW fan, I did like Goldberg, but I couldn't stand the NWO, just a bunch of old men who thought they had a god given right to be on top at the expense of everybody else.

What makes me laugh about the WWE is the commentators lack of understanding for British Geography, British wrestlers are always announced as being from round the corner from where there performing...

I was watching a Wade Barrett match on Raw last year, filmed in Birmingham or London, I think Jerry Lawler said something along the lines of 'Barrett should feel right at home, he was brought up just round the corner...in Preston' Wink
My favourite subject.

At 34 years old I have to admit I am a huge wrestling fan despite my interest waning somewhat.

I was first introduced to it during the World of Sport era although I recall not being particuarly impressed by it. It was an interview, hyping Survivor Series 1990, featuring Demolition and Mr Perfect which ignited my initial interest and I've been into it ever since. I started off with WWF/E before moving on to WCW, ECW (the first incarnation), Puro and Lucha.

Nowdays I follow Chikara (until its apparent demise a few months ago), Dragon Gate and, of course, WWE
Unless it is Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks, then I haven't got a clue.
There was some great comedy value to it, especially with the old women in the crowd.

But as I keep asking some of my mates (who are in their 30s are into it, often go to the arena and are married with kids) - 'why are you getting excited about watching grown men, wearing spandex, lycra or leather, grappling with each other and tossing each other about...?'

Not my cup of tea, but who am I to judge?
(20 Aug 2013, 1:51 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: Unless it is Big Daddy and Giant Haystacks, then I haven't got a clue.
There was some great comedy value to it, especially with the old women in the crowd.

But as I keep asking some of my mates (who are in their 30s are into it, often go to the arena and are married with kids) - 'why are you getting excited about watching grown men, wearing spandex, lycra or leather, grappling with each other and tossing each other about...?'

Not my cup of tea, but who am I to judge?

When you put it like that(or as my mate used to put it 'tossing each other off' Big Grin, conveniently leaving out the word ropes, lol), then I wonder why I like it, lol, but then I could question why people like Eastenders, Emmerdale and Coronation Street, for me, wrestling.is no different, it is staged sports entertainment, it is a Sports Soap Opera.

As to why many 30-somethings like it, I may be wrong, but I think the WWE product is aimed at Older Teens and Young Adults, it certainly was back in the Monday Night War
The first ECW was probs the most revolutionary, I have most the PPVs on dvd. Think the best wrestling now comes from Japan and some American indies like Chikara and PWG. ROH is terrible now unlike back in the early years. Still keen on the likes of CZW though.
I have never been a fan of indy wrestling really, I did watch the original ECW now and again

ECW was revolutionary and I believe that Paul Heyman is a genius, he found a gap in the market, exploited it and ultimately, everybody else saw something and started to adopt the edgy style, while it was just a small organisation that mostly performed out of bingo halls, it has a place in history and wrestling would not be the same today without Heyman and his band of merry men
(20 Aug 2013, 3:02 pm)fozzovmurton Wrote: When you put it like that(or as my mate used to put it 'tossing each other off' Big Grin, conveniently leaving out the word ropes, lol), then I wonder why I like it, lol, but then I could question why people like Eastenders, Emmerdale and Coronation Street, for me, wrestling.is no different, it is staged sports entertainment, it is a Sports Soap Opera.

As to why many 30-somethings like it, I may be wrong, but I think the WWE product is aimed at Older Teens and Young Adults, it certainly was back in the Monday Night War

Your right, what some watch others dislike and vice versa.
As I say, it isn't for me to judge.

I wonder if the 30 somethings are into wrestling, because they were of the first generation to watch SKY TV?
As young, impressionable kids, you get hooked, but usually grow out of it. With wrestling, is it that although the format is the same, the executives are able to adapt and integrate storylines - keeping the entertainment going?
Never really bothered much with WWE since about 2005, apart from WrestleMania. It doesn't stand out for me anymore. I was a WCW fan between 96-99 though, and then switched back to WWE for the end of the attitude era, and then on to the brand/ruthless aggression era. After that I stuck to TNA and ROH mainly. Nowadays though...nothing really!

I do still attend the live events over here. In fact I'm off to Manchester in November for RAW Live. Smile
Forum Moderator | Find NEB on facebook
Visit my Buses & Beyond website. Also on Facebook.
(20 Aug 2013, 6:16 pm)aureolin Wrote: Never really bothered much with WWE since about 2005, apart from WrestleMania. It doesn't stand out for me anymore. I was a WCW fan between 96-99 though, and then switched back to WWE for the end of the attitude era, and then on to the brand/ruthless aggression era. After that I stuck to TNA and ROH mainly. Nowadays though...nothing really!

I do still attend the live events over here. In fact I'm off to Manchester in November for RAW Live. Smile

There is something different about it live, I have been to 2 shows, one at the Arena, the other at the Odyssey in Belfast, and it was like nothing else in my time of been a fan I was was lucky to get up close to some of the wrestlers at Belfast Hilton Big Grin
(20 Aug 2013, 6:14 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: Your right, what some watch others dislike and vice versa.
As I say, it isn't for me to judge.

I wonder if the 30 somethings are into wrestling, because they were of the first generation to watch SKY TV?
As young, impressionable kids, you get hooked, but usually grow out of it. With wrestling, is it that although the format is the same, the executives are able to adapt and integrate storylines - keeping the entertainment going?

My parents wouldn't entertain the idea of having Sky when I was growing up. So while there probably is some element of truth to what you say about the thirty-somethings still enjoying wrestling because they were first generation to grow up with it, it certainly isn't applicable in all situations.
The last wrestling show I attended was a CRW show at Northumbria University in 2011. I also attended a North East Wrestling Society event in Peterlee earlier that year. In 1992 I went to see a WWF event at the Whitley Bay Ice Rink but haven't been any WWF/E shows since. Ultra-Kaos '96 was the first ever indy-show I attended held in Walthamstow with a main event featuring Sabu vs. Mikey Whipwreck vs. The Dirtbike Kid.
(20 Aug 2013, 6:34 pm)AdamY Wrote: My parents wouldn't entertain the idea of having Sky when I was growing up. So while there probably is some element of truth to what you say about the thirty-somethings still enjoying wrestling because they were first generation to grow up with it, it certainly isn't applicable in all situations.

If you don't mind me asking, how did you get into it properly if you didn't have sky?
I know you mentioned the stuff on ITV on a Saturday earlier...
Think the only reason I watch TNA now is, it goes out for the older fan. WWE really is a kids show now and being an older fan you don't wanna watch something that's the 93-95 cartoon era again. North East Wrestling Society recently closed it's doors and I don't think there's anymore wrestling promotions left in the region.
(20 Aug 2013, 6:23 pm)fozzovmurton Wrote: There is something different about it live, I have been to 2 shows, one at the Arena, the other at the Odyssey in Belfast, and it was like nothing else in my time of been a fan I was was lucky to get up close to some of the wrestlers at Belfast Hilton Big Grin

If you think the house shows are good, you should try one of the TV tapings for Raw or Smackdown. Totally different kettle of fish. I was at the last couple of house shows in Newcastle, and I usually manage to get aisle tickets. At least I got to shake hands with Kelly Kelly, and almost had my hand broken by the sheer size of Cena's hand haha..

Haven't actually been to a TV taping for a few years now but looking forward to this one. Luckily there's a few lasses that I know that are bang into it, so I travel around with them. We're doing Mania in the states in a few years time.
Forum Moderator | Find NEB on facebook
Visit my Buses & Beyond website. Also on Facebook.
(20 Aug 2013, 6:57 pm)Andreos1 Wrote: If you don't mind me asking, how did you get into it properly if you didn't have sky?
I know you mentioned the stuff on ITV on a Saturday earlier...

Not at all.

My parents used to watch wrestling on World of Sport before it was kicked off the air by Greg Dyke in 1988. Looking back, I was probably not impressed with it then because of how bland it looked. The wrestling on WoS was more of a magazine-type progrmamme featuring matches from around the country. Although there was some slight element of story-line involvement, it probably wasn't enough to hold my attention or make me care back then.

I was hanging-out at a friends house when I first got into WWF. In contrast to WoS, there were larger than life characters, story-lines to follow, and recaps to tell what you've missed. It was pure entertainment with a little bit of athleticism and violence thrown in and I became instantly hooked. Needless to say, I used to go my friends house to watch wrestling whenever the opportunity presented itself. He used to occasionally tape shows and I used to borrow the tapes from him. My parents bought me additional wrestling tapes as well as wrestling magazines. This opened my eyes to different promotions and different styles of wrestling. I wanted to see more. Classified adverts appeared in some magazines such as Superstars of Wrestling/PowerSlam which promoted the services of tape-traders. Through these traders I was able to purchase stuff from Japan, Mexico and the American independent scene.

The about covers the first four years of my wrestling fandom taking the story until 1994. After that, I discovered the Internet which increased my interest as I was able to get information quickly rather than waiting for to appear in wrestling-mag two months down the line.
(20 Aug 2013, 7:11 pm)aureolin Wrote: Haven't actually been to a TV taping for a few years now but looking forward to this one. Luckily there's a few lasses that I know that are bang into it, so I travel around with them. We're doing Mania in the states in a few years time.

Not that bothered about attending Mania, but I would love to go the RAW show the night after.
(20 Aug 2013, 7:22 pm)AdamY Wrote: Not at all.

My parents used to watch wrestling on World of Sport before it was kicked off the air by Greg Dyke in 1988. Looking back, I was probably not impressed with it then because of how bland it looked. The wrestling on WoS was more of a magazine-type progrmamme featuring matches from around the country. Although there was some slight element of story-line involvement, it probably wasn't enough to hold my attention or make me care back then.

I was hanging-out at a friends house when I first got into WWF. In contrast to WoS, there were larger than life characters, story-lines to follow, and recaps to tell what you've missed. It was pure entertainment with a little bit of athleticism and violence thrown in and I became instantly hooked. Needless to say, I used to go my friends house to watch wrestling whenever the opportunity presented itself. He used to occasionally tape shows and I used to borrow the tapes from him. My parents bought me additional wrestling tapes as well as wrestling magazines. This opened my eyes to different promotions and different styles of wrestling. I wanted to see more. Classified adverts appeared in some magazines such as Superstars of Wrestling/PowerSlam which promoted the services of tape-traders. Through these traders I was able to purchase stuff from Japan, Mexico and the American independent scene.

The about covers the first four years of my wrestling fandom taking the story until 1994. After that, I discovered the Internet which increased my interest as I was able to get information quickly rather than waiting for to appear in wrestling-mag two months down the line.

hahaha, so it was cos of sky then Wink.
Never mind your NES, you wanted to be round your mates watching his sky :p

I was the same with The Simpsons, but no matter how mates or cousins tried, I just couldn't get into it.
Whereas you didn't get the Big Daddy or Giant Haystacks thing, I loved it and the American stuff, just didn't compare.
Maybe it was because the British offering was so naff, who knows. Maybe it was because everyone piled round my Grandparents, ate fish & chips, watched the wrestling, watched the horseracing, listened for their coupon coming in and then ate a home made tea with plate pie afterwards and it held a sentimental value, who knows...