Tyne and Wear Metro

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(29 Dec 2012, 10:26 pm)Brandon Wrote: Thanks for sharing! I'd much rather that viaduct was still in place at the southern end of the bridge instead of that ghastly roundabout. That gyratory system looked like it could have handled traffic much better than the roundabout does today. I read recently on the Skyscraper City Forums I think it was, that traffic on the Queen Alexandra Bridge is expected to reduce by as much as 42% once the new bridge is opened. That should help traffic congestion tremendously.

Back to Metro, the timetable is completely finished now, I've also got the Northern Rail Newcastle-Heworth-Sunderland times in too. I had been considering putting in Dunston, MetroCentre and Blaydon too, but I don't want to make it look more complicated than it already is. If any members are interested in these times, then I'll put them in; but to be honest, it'll be easy enough for anyone to insert a couple of extra rows into the spreadsheet and insert as many or few extra stations as they please.

I'm not 100% convinced that the timetable is completely accurate yet, I'd like to be able to say for sure that every time at every station is correct. I'd be rather embarrassed to say the least if I find a mistake after I've uploaded it. I'll go through one last time tomorrow when I'm a bit more wide awake. Will definitely be uploading tomorrow though.

The last l heard was when this new bridge opens, the QA bridge will only be used by buses and emergency vehicles use only.

As promised - the complete Metro timetable (including Northern Rail services between Sunderland, Heworth and Newcastle).

It's not been without its ups and downs though! Wink

I originally used the "all stops" function on the Traveline Journey planner, but after a third of the way though, I came to realise that there were slight discrepancies between these times and the ones that Nexus publishes. I've gone back through and corrected these mistakes, but unfortunately I cannot guarantee that I've caught them all. If there are any errors remaining, which I'm pretty sure there aren't! - they will only be out by one minute. If an error does come up, please do get in touch and I'd be more than happy to upload a corrected version!

I had a bit of bother with the Coast line to St James. I couldn't for the life of me figure out how there could be more than one train at St James Station at the same time.  For example, during evenings and Sundays, trains appear to take a 15 minute layover. I thought I had messed the times up and ended up going back through them all again. Had a bit of a revelation though. I had always just assumed that St James had only one platform; but after a search on Flickr, it actually turns out it has two platforms! That certainly explained a lot!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wiseman2007/6654556191/ (Anon Mouse - Gary)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/25962069@N07/2566894185/ (Bluebottle Flyer - Mark Appleyard) - That's an old photo, been years since the Yellow Line went to South Hylton! Apparently the lines to South Hylton and South Shields were swapped to provide a more even number of stations on each line. So if there was a delay on the rather long Yellow Line, it would affect fewer stations on the route to South Shields than to Sunderland and South Hylton. I seem to remember the first train of the day from Sunderland always having operated direct to Airport anyway. To this day, there are actually a few early morning trips from Regent Centre that run through to South Shields as Yellow Line trains instead of South Hylton. Perhaps it has something to do with the way the trains are stabled at South Gosforth depot, preventing a few trips from starting at Longbenton instead.

Some other interesting things have come up too. During Monday to Saturday daytimes, what should be the xx13 from South Hylton departs at xx12 instead, passing Sunderland at xx22 and Pelaw at xx42. You wouldn't think that one minute would make such a difference, but the Northern Rail service that leaves Sunderland at xx30 arrives at Heworth at xx42, which is the same time as the Metro in front pulls in at Pelaw! It does seem that the Sunderland line is definitely being pushed to its limits in terms of capacity! The timetable I have included doesn't even include the freight trains or the Grand Central empty stock movements between Sunderland and Heaton Train Yard via Newcastle!

On the timetable, I have included every train time during the day, instead of writing the "minutes past each hour," just so the option is there for members to do that if they'd prefer a slighter smaller version, rather than an enthusiast having to write in the full set of times themselves. After all, it's far easier to delete the times than to write them in!

The Northern Rail timetable is only valid until 18 May 2013. It's been rumoured on the Skyscraper City forums that more trains will begin calling
at Blaydon and Dunston. If the demand is there for it, I may include more Northern Rail stations in this timetable when a new timetable comes into force in May.

Keep in mind that this timetable will change on Public Holidays - best to contact Traveline, Nexus or Northern Rail with regards to these days.


.xlsx   CompleteTyneAndWearMetroTimetable.xlsx (Size: 474.79 KB / Downloads: 15)
Great work, Brandon.
I really do admire the dedication you've put into this project! The speed it has been done in is also commendable.

I'll have this put onto my phone immediately! Big Grin
Awww cheers!

If you wanted it in PDF format, I think this download lets you do that -

http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/index....crobat_pro&loc=us

It gives you a months free trial, but after my trial was finished a few weeks ago I got hounded with pop-ups trying to get me to buy it. I ended up un-installing it after that!
(30 Dec 2012, 11:16 pm)Brandon Wrote: Awww cheers!

If you wanted it in PDF format, I think this download lets you do that -

http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/index....crobat_pro&loc=us

It gives you a months free trial, but after my trial was finished a few weeks ago I got hounded with pop-ups trying to get me to buy it. I ended up un-installing it after that!

I usually convert my Excels etc into PDF inside of Excel itself. Wink
I've just had a look! Yeah you're right, there's an option to publish as a PDF - never even knew you could! Big Grin
Very interesting article in the Chronicle today, especially this part of it -

Plans for the future

EVEN before work has finished on the nine-year regeneration project Metro bosses at Nexus are looking for what happens in the decade after that.

They are currently considering the next expansion of the system, though the days of multi-million pound Government hand outs are likely to have returned by then.

The Metro could be expanded to new parts of the region after transport bosses unveiled a decade worth of expansion plans.

New city centre trams could be introduced as part of long-term plans being considered by the Tyne and Wear Integrated Transport Authority.

Nine new lines, a mixture of trains, trams and special bus routes, are to be put before the board next week, with members being told they have a “once in a generation” opportunity to radically change the future of the rail system.

The plans include the potential for a new tram train line travelling from Newcastle city centre to the west end, a section of Tyneside not connected to the Metro system.

Read More http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-eas...z2GlfF92WZ
Got the Sunderland metro at about ten to four this evening at Haymarket. Once passengers had boarded at Monument, the driver made an announcement over the tannoy. He was making reference to someone who was taking a photo of the approaching metro at Monument and used a flash.

The driver said that not only is he not supposed to be taking photos of metro unless he has a permit; the fact he used a flash in an underground station is "downright stupid" - in his words - and can "dazzle drivers". Bet whomever it was felt pretty stupid after! I certainly wouldn't condone taking photos without a permit; but if you're going to try, then at least do it discretionately by not using a flash! Dangerous more than anything.

Until I started using the Metro as often as I do now, I thought that someone was taking a photo of every train I got on because I kept seeing flashes. It turns out that there seem to be these funny lights that flash just like a camera would as a train is leaving an underground station.

Nexus do seem to be very strict about photography though.
(03 Jan 2013, 7:03 pm)Brandon Wrote: Got the Sunderland metro at about ten to four this evening at Haymarket. Once passengers had boarded at Monument, the driver made an announcement over the tannoy. He was making reference to someone who was taking a photo of the approaching metro at Monument and used a flash.

The driver said that not only is he not supposed to be taking photos of metro unless he has a permit; the fact he used a flash in an underground station is "downright stupid" - in his words - and can "dazzle drivers". Bet whomever it was felt pretty stupid after! I certainly wouldn't condone taking photos without a permit; but if you're going to try, then at least do it discretionately by not using a flash! Dangerous more than anything.

Until I started using the Metro as often as I do now, I thought that someone was taking a photo of every train I got on because I kept seeing flashes. It turns out that there seem to be these funny lights that flash just like a camera would as a train is leaving an underground station.

Nexus do seem to be very strict about photography though.

I've not had a problem with taking photos of Metros from the outside before... Then again, I haven't been foolish enough to use flash in an underground station before! Most of my photos don't come out brilliantly though, given the speed these Metros can go... Perhaps my new camera would be better at taking photos of them but I've not thought the interest would be there for them.
I most certainly don't have a 'permit', would have no idea of how to acquire one, and have no intention of trying to acquire one. In his words, the whole idea of getting a permit to take photos of a Metro is 'downright stupid'.
I always thought the permit thing was about taking photos/videos on metro (inside), not of metro (outside) - but I seem to be mistaken. I'm still non-the-wiser on whether you're allowed to take photos of Metro trains on public property or not - it's all rather confusing to me!

Here's links to a couple of other forums about the issue:

http://railways.national-preservation.co...phers.html

http://www.railforums.co.uk/showthread.php?t=26374



Managed to find some information on the now defunct Project Orpheus for those who are interested -

Introduction

CITIES, like people, need air to breathe. If a city’s main arteries are clogged and congested then, like human beings, they simply begin to fail.

Tyne and Wear is facing that failure in the next 20 years thanks to growing car use and decline in public transport. 

Nexus, the Tyne and Wear Passenger Transport Executive, has overseen the provision of quality public transport since the late sixties and in the last few years has unveiled a blueprint for the future of public transport entitled Project Orpheus.

Orpheus stands on the shoulders of the Tyne and Wear Metro, which has successfully served the people of the North for 25 years and rising. 

Its success in bucking the trend of national public transport decline in recent years could be the key factor in persuading people to "modally shift" or leave their cars behind to access the cities of Sunderland and Newcastle.

Economic regeneration will be hampered and stifled by chronic congestion; modal shift cannot occur without investment and rejuvenation of the existing landscape and without planning and foresight the disadvantaged areas of our society will not have access to jobs, leisure and education.

Without measures to address rising car ownership, less road space and increased pollution, Tyne and Wear could be gripped by epidemic congestion, the kind of which is witnessed daily in the south of England, by 2015 or sooner.

By building on the success of Metro, Project Orpheus can change the panorama for ever. This document sets out how we got here, where we are today and, most importantly, our plans for the future in partnership with the people of Tyne and Wear.

A celebration of 25 years of Metro it also has one foot firmly fixed in the future as Project Orpheus gathers momentum.

Orpheus is being developed to deliver the key objectives of: 
- Providing greater and more equal mobility for the people of Tyne & Wear;
- Assisting the local economy by reducing levels of road traffic congestion;
- Reducing air and noise pollution; and
- Contributing to a healthier and safer society.

The potential market for the Orpheus Project includes encouraging modal shift, maintaining and increasing use amongst existing public transport users, and meeting new traffic generation to serve new development areas.

Preliminary work has identified that this indicative network could add approximately 100 route kilometres to the existing system.

High quality modern bus services with significant priority over other vehicles will provide the solution for most of these corridors for the next 10 years.

Street run trams integrated with the Metro will be the solution on the busiest corridors in 2015-2025.

A Tyne and Wear wide strategy of demand restraint is fundamental to reversing the 20 year decline in public transport use in the region.

Where We Are Going - Project Orpheus "Building on success"

For the last 35 years Nexus has overseen the delivery of high quality public transport, including the award winning Tyne and Wear Metro. The Metro has been an outstanding success offering public travel to 25% of the local population and carrying in excess of 100,000 people per day.

Quality public transport is recognised as an important supporting factor in regeneration and business achievement.

Metro has offered that support in the North East and remains at the heart of public transport in the region.

Metro is a system designed and built in the 70s. Even though it only serves one quarter of the population, it is has been heavily used by hundreds of millions of passengers. As a result, Metro in its current form is coming to the end of its useful life and there is a need to rejuvenate the whole public transport system in the region and meet the aspirations of today’s travelling public and the customers of tomorrow.

In recent years Nexus has lobbied Government for support to improve public transport in the area. The Sunderland Metro extension is an example of the success in persuading Government that public transport can reduce social barriers and open up new markets.

An additional £8million investment in digital CCTV equipment has boosted the public’s perception of safety on the network. This investment has been critical in persuading people to use public transport.

Project Orpheus is looking to take public transport in the North East into a new phase for a new generation of travellers.

It was launched in 2002 with the ambitious aim of making quality public transport accessible to all of Tyne and Wear’s population.

29 key traffic corridors have been analysed across the region to determine the best public transport solution for each corridor. These solutions were identified as a mix of Superoutes with high quality buses, guided bus lanes and the longer- term answer of street running trams in the busiest corridors.

Improving access, ticketing, information and accessibility will be a top priority throughout the Metro system. Over the next twenty years Nexus will also look to replace existing Metro trains with the latest state of the art, customer friendly equipment. Investment in signalling and communication systems will improve the frequency and reliability of core services.

This vision can only become a reality with the support of local, central and European government, as well as partners in the public and private sector.

Without this support, increased traffic congestion will affect the local economy, prevent people moving freely in the area and increase pollution levels.

The aim of Project Orpheus is to upgrade Metro and, together with the bus and tram based solutions for the 29 key traffic corridors, provide our region with a world class public transport system that is second to none.

The aim is to make Project Orpheus THE public transport solution for the next generation.

Without the solutions offered by Project Orpheus, ever increasing traffic congestion in Tyne and Wear will seriously damage the local economy, prevent people from moving freely and increase pollution levels.

25 years of Metro - a regional success story

Tyneside has a long and proud railway history. In 1904 it became one of the first British cities outside London to have an electric suburban railway, electrified to fight off competition from tramways. The electric network was extended to south of the Tyne during the 1930s but electric operation was discontinued in the 1960s when no money was available to renew fixed equipment.

Tramways and buses proved the major players in the public transport map of the decades after WWII and by 1968 Transport legislation was aimed at integration of transport and land use and within transport itself, particularly in public transport.

The Passenger Transport Authorities (PTAs) comprising local Councillors, created in the metropolitan conurbations were responsible for broad policy and the financing and integration of this public transport.

Their Passenger Transport Executives (PTEs) (in the North East TWPTE, renamed Nexus in the mid nineties) were professionally responsible for that implementation.

PTEs ran the buses previously owned by the local councils, were responsible for overall public transport planning and development, and achieved integration through direct operations and via agreements with other bus operators, and with British Rail for local suburban services.

In 1971 the Tyne Wear Plan land use and transportation study recommended a balanced programme of investment in roads and public transport.

It identified the potential of the local railway system was not being realised because it did not penetrate the central areas of Newcastle and Gateshead.

Conversion to a modern urban railway with tunnels penetrating to the main traffic objectives would enable it to be the backbone of a fully integrated public transport system, in the short term for the benefit of the majority without cars, longer term as an attractive alternative to the car.

Thus the idea of Metro was born. A high frequency, modern, accessible network available to the people of the North East.

Local authorities, the PTA and the PTE endorsed these recommendations and both PTA and PTE actively pursued them.

Central Government Grant towards the capital cost was approved late in 1972 and parliamentary Powers to build Metro were given in 1973. Construction began in 1974 and the first section, from Haymarket to Tynemouth, opened in 1980.

The system was then progressively opened in phases through to 1984 when the full 55km of route became operational.

In the mid eighties Government policy moved from integration to deregulation. The Transport Act 1985 introduced commercial operation for local buses and a decrease in local political influence. PTAs no longer had total policy influence, and were limited to decisions on concessionary travel, provision of bus services which are socially necessary but not viable, financial support for local rail services and the overall promotion of public transport.

The Metro system is made up of converted suburban railway and new construction, some of which is in tunnel under the centres of Newcastle, Sunderland and Gateshead.

In 1991 an extension to the Airport was added and likewise an extension to Wearside in 2002.

The 58 Metro stations vary from major underground facilities, through bus and park-and-ride interchanges, to wayside halts in residential areas. Most stations, apart from underground, are unmanned and incorporate facilities for the disabled. Metro was the first railway in the UK to do so.

The 90 articulated twin Metrocars are a British derivative of the FRG Stadtbahnwagen B. They are lightweight steel construction clad in aluminium, and have attractive easily maintainable finishes. Each unit provides seating for 84 passengers and has a crush load capacity of over 200. Generously dimensioned door bays, accessed via sliding plug doors provide space for prams, wheelchairs and luggage; also standees.

Cars are single-manned with the driver being located in a one third width cab at the leading end of the vehicle.

Traction power is collected by pantograph at 1500v DC. Traction and rheostatic braking control is by oil/air camshafts developed from a British-Rail application.

Car suspension comprises Bochum resilient wheels, chevron rubber primary suspension and air suspension between bogie and car body. Air pressure provides a means of load sensing to maintain consistent acceleration and braking rates; slip slide control is also provided.

The system has its own fleet of works locomotives and vehicles, operating out of Gosforth Traction Maintenance Depot where the passenger fleet is also maintained.

Safety signalling uses two and three aspect colour light signals associated with high frequency a.c. track circuits. Inductive train stops are located at every stop signal. Train movements are monitored at an illuminated panel in the Control Room at the Control Centre. There is a dedicated radio link between drivers and control.

Electrical power control is located in the Control Room.

The basic operation of Metro at peak times is 12 minutes South Hylton to St James and 10 minutes South Shields to Airport.

Off peak the frequency is 12 minutes (both) and 15 minutes (both) in the evenings.

The operating day runs from 0530 to 0015.

Tickets are sold from automatic, change-giving machines at all stations. They are available for through-journeys to and from specified bus services.

Travelcard season tickets, available over a wide range of zonal combinations, are available weekly, monthly and annually, off-peak or all-day.

Concessionary travel for children, persons in full time education, the elderly and disabled is funded by the PTA and provided under the PTE arrangements.

The system carries approximately 39 million passengers a year and has significantly reduced journey times in the area.

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Think I'll write to them to see what they have to say. If they tell me that I do need to retrieve some sort of permit, I will ask in advance for some sort of e-mail copy to be sent as an attachment.
If this is not allowed as they have to see me in-person, then I shall take photos without a permit. It's really discouraging for members of the public to be a rail enthusiast if they have to go through a long and dwindling process in order to receive a permit.
I even read on one of the links that even if you do retrieve it, you have to spend it alongside a member of Nexus' staff? But here's the punchline... For £9 an hour?!
Good one, Nexus.
I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that £9 bit! :s

A replacement bus service was operating between South Gosforth, Longbenton and Four Lane Ends this afternoon, which continued into the early evening peak-time period.

I only saw one of the replacement buses; it was a rather good-looking, modern TGM vehicle! I don't know the reg or make but I've seen this bus a few times at Four Lane Ends on a morning where it sometimes operates the Scholars 115 which it shares with Arriva. Kind of looks like an Optare double-decker like an Olympus or something.

First time in over three weeks I decided to catch the 55 instead of the Metro, and then I miss the chance of travelling on that beast of a vehicle; gutted isn't the word! On Facebook, Tyne and Wear Metro claim that there were six buses operating despite someone claiming to have only seen one, and then say that buses should be running at a 15 minute frequency. I wouldn't have thought South Gosforth - Longbenton - Four Lane Ends would require as great as six buses to run at a 15 minute frequency!

Anyway, news article here - http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/52174

edit - looks like the replacement bus service is operating all the way to Shiremoor! - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-eas...z2HOlE1P7F
(08 Jan 2013, 8:52 pm)Brandon Wrote: I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that £9 bit! :s

A replacement bus service was operating between South Gosforth, Longbenton and Four Lane Ends this afternoon, which continued into the early evening peak-time period.

I only saw one of the replacement buses; it was a rather good-looking, modern TGM vehicle! I don't know the reg or make but I've seen this bus a few times at Four Lane Ends on a morning where it sometimes operates the Scholars 115 which it shares with Arriva. Kind of looks like an Optare double-decker like an Olympus or something.

First time in over three weeks I decided to catch the 55 instead of the Metro, and then I miss the chance of travelling on that beast of a vehicle; gutted isn't the word! On Facebook, Tyne and Wear Metro claim that there were six buses operating despite someone claiming to have only seen one, and then say that buses should be running at a 15 minute frequency. I wouldn't have thought South Gosforth - Longbenton - Four Lane Ends would require as great as six buses to run at a 15 minute frequency!

Anyway, news article here - http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/52174

And a better pic too!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/emdjt42/836...hotostream
(08 Jan 2013, 8:52 pm)Brandon Wrote: I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that £9 bit! :s

A replacement bus service was operating between South Gosforth, Longbenton and Four Lane Ends this afternoon, which continued into the early evening peak-time period.

I only saw one of the replacement buses; it was a rather good-looking, modern TGM vehicle! I don't know the reg or make but I've seen this bus a few times at Four Lane Ends on a morning where it sometimes operates the Scholars 115 which it shares with Arriva. Kind of looks like an Optare double-decker like an Olympus or something.

First time in over three weeks I decided to catch the 55 instead of the Metro, and then I miss the chance of travelling on that beast of a vehicle; gutted isn't the word! On Facebook, Tyne and Wear Metro claim that there were six buses operating despite someone claiming to have only seen one, and then say that buses should be running at a 15 minute frequency. I wouldn't have thought South Gosforth - Longbenton - Four Lane Ends would require as great as six buses to run at a 15 minute frequency!

Anyway, news article here - http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/52174

edit - looks like the replacement bus service is operating all the way to Shiremoor! - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-eas...z2HOlE1P7F

Probably Volvo B9TL LJ58GCF which is a tri-axle decker with Optare Olympus body?
Cheers I think it is!

I thought I'd seen a photo very recently!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielgrahamm/8273747541/ (Daniel Graham)
(08 Jan 2013, 8:59 pm)tyresmoke Wrote:
(08 Jan 2013, 8:52 pm)Brandon Wrote: I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that £9 bit! :s

A replacement bus service was operating between South Gosforth, Longbenton and Four Lane Ends this afternoon, which continued into the early evening peak-time period.

I only saw one of the replacement buses; it was a rather good-looking, modern TGM vehicle! I don't know the reg or make but I've seen this bus a few times at Four Lane Ends on a morning where it sometimes operates the Scholars 115 which it shares with Arriva. Kind of looks like an Optare double-decker like an Olympus or something.

First time in over three weeks I decided to catch the 55 instead of the Metro, and then I miss the chance of travelling on that beast of a vehicle; gutted isn't the word! On Facebook, Tyne and Wear Metro claim that there were six buses operating despite someone claiming to have only seen one, and then say that buses should be running at a 15 minute frequency. I wouldn't have thought South Gosforth - Longbenton - Four Lane Ends would require as great as six buses to run at a 15 minute frequency!

Anyway, news article here - http://tyneandwear.sky.com/news/article/52174

edit - looks like the replacement bus service is operating all the way to Shiremoor! - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north-eas...z2HOlE1P7F

Probably Volvo B9TL LJ58GCF which is a tri-axle decker with Optare Olympus body?

Gutting if it was, it looks immense from the exterior... Could only be even better on the inside!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielgrahamm/8273747541/
Cheers Dan! Looks like we both posted a link to your photo at pretty much the same time Tongue

If I see this bus laying over at Four Lane Ends on a morning before its Scholars run and I have time, I'll try to ask the driver if I'd be allowed inside for a few photos. I can't seem to find any interior photos on Flickr. 9 times out of 10 though it's an Arriva Volvo in United livery running the 115, but that particular TGM bus does sneak out occasionally!
(08 Jan 2013, 9:32 pm)Brandon Wrote: Cheers Dan! Looks like we both posted a link to your photo at pretty much the same time Tongue

If I see this bus laying over at Four Lane Ends on a morning before its Scholars run and I have time, I'll try to ask the driver if I'd be allowed inside for a few photos. I can't seem to find any interior photos on Flickr. 9 times out of 10 though it's an Arriva Volvo in United livery running the 115, but that particular TGM bus does sneak out occasionally!

:L Recognised the reg straight away and thought "I've gotta pic of that!"
Ooh, do try! I'll be rather envious indeed if you do manage. Whenever I've seen it, it's always been jam-packed with students!
Quite a bit of disruption this morning, particularly on the Sunderland line. Apparently there was a points failure near Brockley Whins.

I nearly got off the bus at the Wheatsheaf and walked down to St Peters instead because the bus was running a few minutes late, but I'm glad I chanced it and stayed on till Sunderland where I would have been warmer. Arrived for the 06:14 metro, announcement guy reckons it would be four minutes late - fair do's I suppose. A few minutes later that became 8 minutes late, then 20 minutes late. It ended up arriving almost 25 minutes late.

We ended up having a 15 minute wait at Seaburn, and another 15-20 minute wait at East Boldon. At East Boldon, an announcement on the station platform announced that all trains are suspended Pelaw-South Hylton and no bus replacement service would be operating. I very nearly got off the metro then to call a taxi, and a few people actually did. 30 seconds later or so, the driver announces that the train would be able to continue to Pelaw in a few minutes. I appreciate that the ice and cold weather causes disruption, but it's the conflicting announcements that I think could be improved upon.

It's the same at Sunderland; the guy bends over backwards giving very regular updates and apologising profusely for delays to the 06:20 Northern Rail service to Hartlepool, and a ridiculous amount of updates on the 06:10 Tyne and Wear Metro service to South Hylton, but there were only three updates for the 06:14 Tyne and Wear Metro service to Airport. I've never even anyone waiting for the 06:10 service to South Hylton before.

Nexus apparently only subsidise the Northern Rail service between Newcastle and Sunderland. So I don't understand why they always give updates on the 06:10 service from Sunderland to Hartlepool but never any updates at all for the 06:45 Grand Central service to London. And that's not just today either.

Ended up at work an hour later than I wanted to, so had to put in that hour at the end of the day which I wasn't very happy about. Hopefully it'll not happen again! Big Grin

I'll write an email to Nexus asking about these announcements. I just feel sorry for the people who listened to the advice that all trains had been suspended and then left, only for the driver to announce almost immediately after that we'd be moving soon. Driver was fabulous though; I can't thank him enough for keeping us informed throughout.
I had heard on the radio this morning that all Metros were suspended from Pelaw to South Hylton - and that was at around 07:30am!
I wondered why, as I don't believe a reason was given on-air.

Last month (around the 21st or so), I remember that all the Metros were really bad then. The announcement system said that the next Metro to Airport was actually delayed by 40 minutes, and that multiple Metros to South Hylton were arriving all at the same time, so they'd have to use both stations on either side.
It was a chaotic mess, and there were no staff supervising the station at all. After a further 30 minutes or so of several people listening to the announcements and others getting on board the Metros that had arrived at Platform 3 (or 2 - whichever it is Airport-bound) and a complaint made to the Northern Rail staff upstairs by a few people, ONE member of staff who wasn't a part of Nexus' team came downstairs and said that the announcements were wrong, and those Metros on the platform we were on are going to Airport, and not South Hylton as the announcements had been saying.

I was reaaaaaally annoyed that day - as was the woman who was there for over an hour with me.