Politics (and other political stuff)

1267 Replies, 715371 Views

(27 May 2014, 7:18 pm)aureolin Wrote: As long as you agree with the main principals of the party, you'll be fine. I used to attend the local CLP meetings when I had loads of free time, and also contributed quite a bit towards Bridget Phillipson's big bus campaign.

Something definitely worth thinking about, because I have an interest in politics but don't know a great deal about...

I may just join and offer my services in time for the dissolution of parliament and help with campaigning
(27 May 2014, 7:32 pm)marxistafozzski Wrote: I may just join and offer my services in time for the dissolution of parliament and help with campaigning

As I've said to someone else, you gain a quick political education by getting involved - especially in the run up to a general election.
(27 May 2014, 7:39 pm)AdamY Wrote: As I've said to someone else, you gain a quick political education by getting involved - especially in the run up to a general election.

I can only echo this. Trade Unionism really educated me politically. In addition to the Durham Gala, I've been fortunate enough to visit many rallies around the country, the March for an Alternative in London, and also a handful of union conferences.

One other thing you could consider is Unite community membership. There's a lot of room for volunteering, and they really make an effort to involve people interested in politics and trade unionism.
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I was at Northumbria University studying History and Politics when the last general election took place in 2010. We were all encouraged to get involved with our local political parties. One of lecturers actually claimed that you 'learn more out there than you do in here' - he was right.

Like Auerolin points out, the political realm expands beyond the scope of political parties. If no political party or trade union takes your fancy then there's always lobby groups and community groups to get involved with too.
Apart from being an FPF member and spokesman for the group Big Grin, I am a trade union member and also took an active role in a well known campaign group 8/9 years ago.

Politics was never something that was discussed when I was a kid growing up - although there was one memory of my Dad telling me a story about my Grandad when he was a kid.
I didn't know the reasoning behind events until I was a lot older (and my political beliefs had already been established).

When my Grandad was a kid, he witnessed events during the General Strike. He witnessed police charging an assaulting miners, their wives and kids in the street - all under orders from none other than Winston Churchill.
Events over those few days, shaped the political beliefs of my Grandad and did for a while, rub off onto my Dad (he was a member of the Young Communists at one point - something I only found out fairly recently).

As a kid, my folks wouldn't discuss politics in front of me or my brothers - which was possibly difficult, as Thatcher was PM at the time.
The only time I ever remember him discussing it, was when I asked him one night, whether he wanted Heseltine, Major or Hurd to replace Thatcher.
He gave his answer as Heseltine, which on reflection now - summed up his beliefs at the time. Although he didn't give a reason. Not sure I asked for one to be honest.

Despite all of that, growing up under Thatcher has probably made me the person I am now.

My youngest brother (who grew up under the last throws of the Tory's and the start of New Labour) is at Uni and to my surprise, has joined up with all sorts of left wing groups. Going to rallies up and down the country.
My middle brother, well he is the total opposite. Always was a strange kid Wink.

My mam just laughs at the three of us and my Dad during the rare times we get together - particularly as my Dad has started to agree with some of Thatcher's policies and is edging further to that side of the fence.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(27 May 2014, 8:40 pm)Andreos Constantopolous Wrote: Apart from being an FPF member and spokesman for the group Big Grin, I am a trade union member and also took an active role in a well known campaign group 8/9 years ago.

Politics was never something that was discussed when I was a kid growing up - although there was one memory of my Dad telling me a story about my Grandad when he was a kid.
I didn't know the reasoning behind events until I was a lot older (and my political beliefs had already been established).

When my Grandad was a kid, he witnessed events during the General Strike. He witnessed police charging an assaulting miners, their wives and kids in the street - all under orders from none other than Winston Churchill.
Events over those few days, shaped the political beliefs of my Grandad and did for a while, rub off onto my Dad (he was a member of the Young Communists at one point - something I only found out fairly recently).

As a kid, my folks wouldn't discuss politics in front of me or my brothers - which was possibly difficult, as Thatcher was PM at the time.
The only time I ever remember him discussing it, was when I asked him one night, whether he wanted Heseltine, Major or Hurd to replace Thatcher.
He gave his answer as Heseltine, which on reflection now - summed up his beliefs at the time. Although he didn't give a reason. Not sure I asked for one to be honest.

Despite all of that, growing up under Thatcher has probably made me the person I am now.

My youngest brother (who grew up under the last throws of the Tory's and the start of New Labour) is at Uni and to my surprise, has joined up with all sorts of left wing groups. Going to rallies up and down the country.
My middle brother, well he is the total opposite. Always was a strange kid Wink.

My mam just laughs at the three of us and my Dad during the rare times we get together - particularly as my Dad has started to agree with some of Thatcher's policies and is edging further to that side of the fence.

The only political conversations I really had as a youngster were that you had to vote Labour, and that you're never to cross a picket line.
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(27 May 2014, 8:04 pm)aureolin Wrote: I can only echo this. Trade Unionism really educated me politically. In addition to the Durham Gala, I've been fortunate enough to visit many rallies around the country, the March for an Alternative in London, and also a handful of union conferences.

One other thing you could consider is Unite community membership. There's a lot of room for volunteering, and they really make an effort to involve people interested in politics and trade unionism.

Durham Big Meeting always turns into a mighty big piss up whenever I go, plus I am not the kind of person who listens to the speeches, I am sure the speakers are excellen, but I find I get bored too easy and struggle to concentrate on what is being said

(27 May 2014, 8:40 pm)Andreos Constantopolous Wrote: Apart from being an FPF member and spokesman for the group Big Grin, I am a trade union member and also took an active role in a well known campaign group 8/9 years ago.

Politics was never something that was discussed when I was a kid growing up - although there was one memory of my Dad telling me a story about my Grandad when he was a kid.
I didn't know the reasoning behind events until I was a lot older (and my political beliefs had already been established).

When my Grandad was a kid, he witnessed events during the General Strike. He witnessed police charging an assaulting miners, their wives and kids in the street - all under orders from none other than Winston Churchill.
Events over those few days, shaped the political beliefs of my Grandad and did for a while, rub off onto my Dad (he was a member of the Young Communists at one point - something I only found out fairly recently).

As a kid, my folks wouldn't discuss politics in front of me or my brothers - which was possibly difficult, as Thatcher was PM at the time.
The only time I ever remember him discussing it, was when I asked him one night, whether he wanted Heseltine, Major or Hurd to replace Thatcher.
He gave his answer as Heseltine, which on reflection now - summed up his beliefs at the time. Although he didn't give a reason. Not sure I asked for one to be honest.

Despite all of that, growing up under Thatcher has probably made me the person I am now.

My youngest brother (who grew up under the last throws of the Tory's and the start of New Labour) is at Uni and to my surprise, has joined up with all sorts of left wing groups. Going to rallies up and down the country.
My middle brother, well he is the total opposite. Always was a strange kid Wink.

My mam just laughs at the three of us and my Dad during the rare times we get together - particularly as my Dad has started to agree with some of Thatcher's policies and is edging further to that side of the fence.

My old great granny once made me laugh...her opinion on Thatcher was 'I don't condone terrorism, but the IRA should have done a better job in blowing the horrible bitch to Kingdom come', but that women was very bigoted according to my granddad who told me she hated catholics, showed support for people like Enoch Powell was against immigration and thought nothing of using words like n****r or p**i.

My introduction to politics is pretty simple it has been drilled into me that my roots are with the Labour Movement, my ancestors voted Labour, so I naturally ended up following in the footsteps of my ancestors, also when I was 16 I met Arthur Scargill and that man put me off politics for years, he tried to get me to join the Young Socialists and pretty much talked down to me when I told I was not interested in politics at that time
(27 May 2014, 9:03 pm)aureolin Wrote: The only political conversations I really had as a youngster were that you had to vote Labour, and that you're never to cross a picket line.

That's pretty much what I learnt as a child, and also that a Scab will always be a scab, wretched little men who deserve everything they get coming to them
(27 May 2014, 9:03 pm)aureolin Wrote: The only political conversations I really had as a youngster were that you had to vote Labour, and that you're never to cross a picket line.

Didn't even get that.
Despite family members being out in 84, it was never discussed in front of us - phone calls or chats, only ever happened when we were encouraged to play outside or go and play in our rooms. Only recently have a couple of older cousins brought it up - probably to do with anniversary's.

Despite my Dad harbouring middle class ambitions (Bob and Thelma = my folks), they left anything such as religion or political beliefs entirely up to us.
Both parents were brought up as religious -
but they never forced anything like that on us at all.

(27 May 2014, 9:03 pm)marxistafozzski Wrote: Durham Big Meeting always turns into a mighty big piss up whenever I go, plus I am not the kind of person who listens to the speeches, I am sure the speakers are excellen, but I find I get bored too easy and struggle to concentrate on what is being said


old great granny once made me laugh...her opinion on Thatcher was 'I don't condone terrorism, but the IRA should have done a better job in blowing the horrible bitch to Kingdom come', but that women was very bigoted according to my granddad who told me she hated catholics, showed support for people like Enoch Powell was against immigration and thought nothing of using words like n****r or p**i.

My introduction to politics is pretty simple it has been drilled into me that my roots are with the Labour Movement, my ancestors voted Labour, so I naturally ended up following in the footsteps of my ancestors, also when I was 16 I met Arthur Scargill and that man put me off politics for years, he tried to get me to join the Young Socialists and pretty much talked down to me when I told I was not interested in politics at that time

Whether they are like that by intention or not, I found a lot of older people have opinions of someone who is different - regardless of their underlying religious or political views.

I find it quite funny when my 94yr old Grandma comes out with something about a foreigner.

My eldest was shocked beyond belief when he heard her come out with something over Christmas, probably with him being from a much younger, more politically correct generation. He often corrects my Dad, if something un-pc slips out.

I would go as far as saying several of us on the forum are probably of the generation that saw changes in words and language (what may have been acceptable when we were younger, isn't now), whilst my eldest and some of the younger ones on the forum, are of a generation that doesn't use those words or language.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
Like Andreos, my parents allowed my brother and I to choose our own political and religious allegiances. My father, who comes from a middle-class background, is a Conservative while my mother, who comes from a working-class background, identifies herself as a Socialist. Despite their respective political dispositions, I don't recall any arguments or discussion about politics during my childhood. However, I was aware of the Miners Strike, Trade Unions and, of course, Picket Lines so I can only presume that this must have been talked about at some point. Religion never came up at all as we never to church as a family and neither my brother or myself are Christened or Baptised.

Aside from my mother and father, family members from both sides have been political participants in some way. My father's uncle (my Grandma's brother) has had an article written about him in the journal of the North East Labour History Society which can be accessed through the following link if you fancy a read: http://nelh.net/who-was-who/lionel-anwell/

Someone on my mothers side chained himself to the doors of Blaydon Council Offices during the Great Strike of 1926. Also, one of my cousins (on my dad's side) is the partner (not sure if they're married) of the UK head of a very well-known international lobby group. He has appeared on Newsnight on numerous occasions and apparently receives Christmas Cards from David Cameron. Although I've haven't met him, I get the impression that my mam and dad weren't impressed by him.
http://aviewfromhamcommon.blogspot.co.uk...l.html?m=1

Old hat now, but still quite funny.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(27 May 2014, 11:26 pm)AdamY Wrote: Like Andreos, my parents allowed my brother and I to choose our own political and religious allegiances. My father, who comes from a middle-class background, is a Conservative while my mother, who comes from a working-class background, identifies herself as a Socialist. Despite their respective political dispositions, I don't recall any arguments or discussion about politics during my childhood. However, I was aware of the Miners Strike, Trade Unions and, of course, Picket Lines so I can only presume that this must have been talked about at some point. Religion never came up at all as we never to church as a family and neither my brother or myself are Christened or Baptised.

Aside from my mother and father, family members from both sides have been political participants in some way. My father's uncle (my Grandma's brother) has had an article written about him in the journal of the North East Labour History Society which can be accessed through the following link if you fancy a read: http://nelh.net/who-was-who/lionel-anwell/

Someone on my mothers side chained himself to the doors of Blaydon Council Offices during the Great Strike of 1926. Also, one of my cousins (on my dad's side) is the partner (not sure if they're married) of the UK head of a very well-known international lobby group. He has appeared on Newsnight on numerous occasions and apparently receives Christmas Cards from David Cameron. Although I've haven't met him, I get the impression that my mam and dad weren't impressed by him.

When it came to religion, it was never in our house, I have been christened as a baby and always identified as being CofE, but did not start regularly attending church till October last year, a pentecostal church in Sunderland
So voters across Europe have all submitted their ballot papers and we have decided on next EU Commission President!
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(27 Jun 2014, 4:25 pm)Andreos Constantopolous Wrote: So voters across Europe have all submitted their ballot papers and we have decided on next EU Commission President!

Is it still looking lightly that Juncky dude or whatever his name is will win the ballot
(27 Jun 2014, 4:34 pm)marxistafozzski Wrote: Is it still looking lightly that Juncky dude or whatever his name is will win the ballot

Looks like a done deal.

Shows the EU to be the shambolic dictatorship it really is.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(27 Jun 2014, 4:41 pm)Andreos Constantopolous Wrote: Looks like a done deal.

Shows the EU to be the shambolic dictatorship it really is.

Do you think that alone will be the deciding factor for the in/out referendum to become a very real prospect should Dave get elected next
(27 Jun 2014, 4:45 pm)marxistafozzski Wrote: Do you think that alone will be the deciding factor for the in/out referendum to become a very real prospect should Dave get elected next

He was doing a live press conference on BBC just now and he seems to be using that as part of his rhetoric.
'Illegitimis non carborundum'
(27 Jun 2014, 5:06 pm)Andreos Constantopolous Wrote: He was doing a live press conference on BBC just now and he seems to be using that as part of his rhetoric.

What I find most amusing is the Juncky and The Tories where in the same alliance in the EU till recently...

I wonder if it will put the skids on big Nige at next year's General Election if Dave Gives an absolute cast iron guarantee for A referendum, not that I expected UKIP to cause a political earthquake mind
Love how one German paper describes Dave Cameron...

The Wayne Rooney of EU Politics

Some other commentator on the BBC described him as being like a footballer who dived in the area, got a penalty, missed and went to bite the keeper

I never realised his name was David Cameron Suarez
(27 Jun 2014, 10:12 pm)marxistafozzski Wrote: Love how one German paper describes Dave Cameron...

The Wayne Rooney of EU Politics

Some other commentator on the BBC described him as being like a footballer who dived in the area, got a penalty, missed and went to bite the keeper

I never realised his name was David Cameron Suarez

Haha - the two have a lot in common!